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  • Diagnosis of Tooth-Related Pain

    Diagnosis of Tooth-Related Pain

    Under the hard outer enamel of a tooth is soft tissue, nerves and blood vessels called “pulp”. The pulp lies in the canals that run lengthwise through the center of the tooth, from the top of the crown to the bottom of the roots. When the pulp becomes infected, it must be removed or it can cause more damage to the surrounding tissue and lead to an abscess. Symptoms may include sensitivity to hot or cold temperature, tenderness when biting or chewing, and swelling. If you experience any pain or sensitivity, you may need Root Canal Therapy.

  • Non-Surgical Root Canal Therapy

    To remove the diseased pulp, an opening must be made in the top of the tooth to expose the pulp chamber. The diseased tissue is then extracted and the canals cleaned. Once cleaned, the space is then filled with a safe, rubber-like substance called “gutta-percha” and cement to completely seal the root canals and prevent bacteria from entering. If the tooth lacks sufficient structure, a post may be but inside and then sealed. A temporary filling is then put into the crown until it can be fully restored by your general dentist within 2 weeks.

  • Non-Surgical Root Canal Retreatment

    In most cases, teeth that have had endodontic treatment can last just as long as your natural teeth. Occasionally, successfully treated teeth may become painful or diseased long after treatment if it has not healed properly, or if a new problem arises. It is always best to save your natural teeth whenever possible, so a retreatment may be needed.
    A retreatment may require existing restorative materials to be removed (crown, post and core material, root filings, etc.) This allows access to the root canals so that they can be thoroughly cleaned and resealed. A temporary filling is then put into the crown until it can be fully restored by your general dentist within 2 weeks.
  • Endodontic Surgery (Apicoectomy)

    When a canal is too narrow for instruments to be used during non-surgical root canal therapy, endodontic surgery may be needed to reach the ends of the roots and help save your tooth, particularly if the bony areas around the end of your tooth is inflamed or infected. A small incision is made in the gum to expose the underlying bone so that the diseased tissue can be removed. A filing may be placed in the root at the end of the canal as well as a few stitches to help the tissue heal properly. Over time, your bone will heal around the end of the root. This is all done under local anesthesia utilizing a sophisticated microscope and special instruments. We recommend you have someone to drive you home after this procedure.

  • Single Tooth Internal Bleaching

    A tooth that has had endodontic treatment may become discolored due to blood or other fluids that have seeped in and stained the internal structure of the tooth. To whiten the tooth from the inside out, the most common method of bleaching is called The Walking Bleach method. In this procedure, a small hole is made in the tooth and a safe bleaching paste is placed in the pulp chamber. Depending on the degree of the stain, the paste may need to be replaced until desired results are achieved and the hole permanently sealed.

  • Internal Resorption

    Internal resorption is a rare condition where the living cells within a tooth attack and eat away the inside of the tooth. Initially, the process is slow and painless and may only be detected with dental x-rays. If left untreated, the tooth can weaken to the point of breakage. Although it is still unknown why cells attack their own teeth, the most common cause of internal resorption is due to trauma. Non-surgical root canal therapy can remove the harmful cells before they do more damage.

  • External Resorption

    External resorption is a condition where the surface of the root of the tooth begins to dissolve away inward toward the pulp. In many case, the cause of external resorption is unknown, but can be caused by trauma, cysts, tumors, or chronic inflammation. If found early enough, it can be treated with non-surgical root canal therapy.

  • Apexogenesis

    When traumatic injuries occur to children, their teeth may not be fully developed at the time of the injury, so special procedures are required save the immature tooth. The apexogenesis procedure allows the root of the tooth to continue developing, the apex to close naturally, and the walls of the root canal to thicken as the tooth matures. Medicine is applied to the soft tissue to promote growth and heal the pulp.

  • Apexification

    When traumatic injuries occur to children, their teeth may not be fully developed at the time of the injury, so special procedures are required save the immature tooth. In apexification, unhealthy pulp is removed and medicine is applied to the root to help form hard tissue to close the root tip (apex) and act as a barrier for the root canal filling. In this procedure, the root canal will not continue to develop naturally, making the tooth susceptible to fractures. It is important to have the tooth properly restored by your dentist after apexification.

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